Psychology and Philosophy

LYOSB09 (Available for all periods: 09:50 – 11:10, 29 June – 10 July, 13 – 24 July 2020)

Elif Yavnık

Elif Yavnık

Mind and Behavior: What is the subconscious? How much can we trust our memory? Do other animals have languages? Can intelligence be developed or artificially created? Are you born with your personality or do you learn it? We will make an introduction to psychology, the study of mind and behavior, by answering these questions and more. Subjects to be discussed include perception, communication, memory, learning, decision-making, sleep, emotions, religion, and understanding of art. We will discuss how these mental abilities change from person to person, develop from childhood, the location that they correspond to in the brain, and what we can learn from disease- and accident-induced "short circuits" or psychopathology. We will also gain an understanding of how modern philosophy works by focusing on a few of the questions that we will choose among those below: Could we be living in a Matrix-like world? If so, does this mean that we don't know much of what we think we know? What is to know? Is perception the foundation of knowledge? Can a tree be said to exist in a forest where no one sees or perceives it? Do numbers, fairies, concepts exist? What does it mean to exist? Can our mind, reason and desires be reduced to physical phenomena? Can the mind be thought of as a computer program, or is it made of neural activity? Can will be free? If not, is it possible for us to have moral responsibilities? Is changing the tracks of a train to save five people on one track while sacrificing one person on the new track always the right thing to do? Can there be instances where killing is right? Can cultural and historical differences be considered in a moral framework? Why should we be moral? Can a discipline that asks such bizarre questions actually be scientific? What is "scientific"?

LYO